TWWHA Status and Trends reports now online

Minister for Parks

TWWHA Status and Trends reports now online

15 June 2022

The Tasmanian Liberal Government is ensuring that our special natural places are protected and presented in ways that allow people of all abilities to enjoy the natural and cultural values they contain.
 
We know that the ecosystems within the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area (TWWHA) are of outstanding significance for their exceptional natural beauty, distinctive landforms, paleo-endemic species and plant communities, and having ecological processes that result in some of the tallest vegetation in the world.

The statutory TWWHA Management Plan (2016) remains key to specifying how the Outstanding Universal Value of the property is preserved and managed to promote protection of the property for future generations.

The delivery of Status and Trends reports are identified as an action under the Management Plan, so I am pleased to advise today that this important suite of reports that will inform adaptive management within the TWWHA are now available online including:

  • Status and Trends in the Condition of the Natural Values of the TWWHA;
  • Status and Trends in the Condition of the Cultural Values of the TWWHA; and
  • Summary Status and Trends in the Condition of Cultural and Natural Values of the TWWHA.

These important Status and Trends reports will assist the Tasmanian Government in making priority policy decisions on adaptive management within the TWWHA both now and into the future.

This will be the first time that such a wealth of information on the values of the property have been compiled for publication.

The TWWHA makes up almost one quarter of Tasmania, and this important body of work is in addition to the TWWHA Natural Values Climate Change and Adaptation Strategy 2021-2031; the TWWHA Biosecurity Strategy 2021 – 2031; and the TWWHA Fire Management Plan, which all assist in helping to protect this precious landscape for Tasmanians and visitors to enjoy for generations.

The Status and Trends reports are available now on the Department of Natural Resources and Environment’s website.

Aboriginal cultural burning in Tasmania

Minister for Parks

Aboriginal cultural burning in Tasmania

9 June 2022

The Tasmanian Liberal Government is providing $1.3 million in the 2022-23 Tasmanian Budget for Aboriginal cultural burning in Tasmania to support joint land management outcomes between the Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) and Tasmanian Aboriginal people.

The funding provided will enable the PWS to employ Aboriginal Engagement Officers to ensure the success of the cultural burning program, support engagement activities between the PWS, Tasmanian Aboriginal people and organisations, and identify areas that are suitable for cultural burning.

Aboriginal cultural burning practices have been undertaken for tens of thousands of years and have helped shape the Tasmanian landscape we know today.

Importantly, this Government recognises that Aboriginal cultural burning in Tasmania is only undertaken by Tasmanian Aboriginal people.

This is because of the deep, ongoing connection that Tasmanian Aboriginal people have with their land, including sophisticated land management practices such as cool burning, and the important part this has played in Tasmania’s culture and history.

We want to draw on the deep connection Tasmanian Aboriginals have with this land and to share in their knowledge of cultural burning practices to help reduce the impact of wildfires, and also deliver ecological benefits for Tasmania’s landscapes, including fauna and flora.

These important engagement activities will be supported by the Cultural Burning Policy and procedures, which is being undertaken in consultation with PWS Aboriginal staff and Tasmanian Aboriginal people, and will support Aboriginal community controlled organisations to undertake cultural burning activities.

This important body of work is currently out for consultation with input sought from Tasmanian Aboriginal people and organisations prior to the PWS undertaking consultation with other stakeholders.

The pilot program in 2021 also included a Cultural Burning Grants Program with grants provided to undertake cultural burns, purchase equipment, travel to burn locations, and attend Firestick Alliance training.

I am very pleased to announce that the grants program will continue with the PWS currently undertaking a review of last year’s program to inform the future structure of the program.

I am also pleased to announce that the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area Fire Management Plan has been finalised. The Plan outlines the adaptive management framework that will be utilised to modify fuel characteristics and behaviour, and to protect fire-sensitive natural and cultural historical assets that form an important part of our cultural landscape.

Protecting the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area through the TWWHA Biosecurity Strategy

Minister for Parks

Protecting the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area through the TWWHA Biosecurity Strategy

8 June 2022

The Tasmanian Government is committed to protecting, promoting and managing Tasmania’s world-renowned parks and reserve system, which includes responding to the threat of invasive weeds, animals and diseases.

As a key outcome of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area (TWWHA) Management Plan 2016, the TWWHA Biosecurity Strategy 2021-2031 has been developed to respond to the threat of invasive weeds, animals and diseases.

The Tasmanian Budget 2022-23 includes funding of $3.27 million over the next four years, with $870,000 for this year to implement the TWWHA Biosecurity Strategy.

The purpose of the Strategy is to guide management activities and decision making to minimise the impacts of invasive organisms on the natural and cultural values of the TWWHA.

The TWWHA covers almost a quarter of the land area of Tasmania and is recognised as possessing Outstanding Universal Value under UNESCO’S World Heritage Convention.

The Strategy identifies seven goals to address biosecurity risks in the TWWHA and provides a framework covering aspects such as leadership, planning, communication, documentation, training, education, research, compliance, coordination, and emergency response.

The Strategy was developed following an extensive risk assessment which considered natural events, and management and recreational activities that occur in and around the TWWHA which could spread or introduce invasive organisms.

The Tasmanian Liberal Government is delivering on the TWHHA Biosecurity Strategy to strengthen Tasmania’s future. 

Expanding Mole Creek Karst National Park

Minister for Parks

Expanding Mole Creek Karst National Park

16 September 2021

It’s my pleasure today to announce the Tasmanian Liberal Government’s intention to expand the beautiful Mole Creek Karst National Park to deliver better protection of the area’s unique limestone cave systems.

The expansion of the Mole Creek Kast National Park will occur through the reservation of an additional 2,850 hectares of land currently classified as Future Potential Production Forest land, and includes land known as Solomons Dome, which contains the catchment of the internationally significant Kubla Khan Cave.

The inclusion of these parcels of FPPF land will expand and consolidate what is currently a fragmented National Park, improving the natural values, protection and management efficiency within Mole Creek Kast National Park.

This process has involved significant public consultation, natural values assessments and a substantial body of work by the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment.

In addition, we are proposing that a further 22,550 hectares of FPPF land in the TWWHA be formally reserved as either conservation area, or regional reserve in accordance with the assessment of their natural values.

As many of these areas display evidence of past land use practices, reserving the remaining areas of FPPF Crown land as either conservation area or regional reserve is consistent with the requirements of the Nature Conservation Act 2002 and the management objectives for the TWWHA and will ensure these areas are appropriately protected.

Importantly, this proposal does not preclude the involvement of Tasmanian Aboriginal people in land management nor does it create additional barriers to land return in the future.

This proposal delivers on our commitment to reserve FPPF land within the TWWHA, and is a significant contribution to the Tasmanian Reserve Estate under the Nature Conservation Act 2002. Once reserved, the land will be managed in accordance with the TWWHA Management Plan.

The proposal will now go through the required statutory processes, including the approval of both Houses of Parliament.

The Tasmanian Liberal Government will continue to ensure that our special natural places are protected and presented in ways that allow people of all abilities to enjoy the natural and cultural values they contain.

More information can be found on the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment website.

Feedback sought on fire management planning for the TWWHA

Minister for Parks

Feedback sought on fire management planning for the TWWHA

9 September 2021

The Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) is releasing the draft Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area (TWWHA) Fire Management Plan for public comment.

A comprehensive Fire Management Plan is vitally important for the TWWHA in order to protect its Outstanding Universal Values as well as critical State infrastructure.

We recognise that the TWWHA covers nearly a quarter of the Tasmanian land mass and has many areas of fire-sensitive, high value, natural and cultural assets which are irreplaceable if impacted by bushfire.

The TWWHA Fire Management Plan seeks to minimise the risk of destructive bushfires as well as providing a contemporary planned burning program to maintain fire-dependent ecosystems.

The Plan also recognises the role of past Aboriginal burning practices in shaping the cultural landscape of the TWWHA, and the contemporary role of planned fire regimes in maintaining these practices.

One of the objectives of the fire management program for the TWWHA focuses on the suppression of bushfires that pose a threat to public safety and other values located inside the TWWHA or on adjoining lands.

The draft Fire Management Plan for the TWWHA is shaped by community consultation following the release of an issues paper last year.

The 44th World Heritage Committee report, handed down in June 2021, welcomed the Tasmanian Government’s commitment to developing a comprehensive Fire Management Plan.

This consultation phase that begins today is the next key step in delivering on that commitment.

To view the draft Plan visit the PWS website at www.parks.tas.gov.au

Protecting the Outstanding Universal Value of the TWWHA

Minister for Parks

Protecting the Outstanding Universal Value of the TWWHA

9 September 2021

The Tasmanian Liberal Government remains committed to the effective management and protection of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area (TWWHA), which is recognised through the World Heritage Convention as having both cultural and natural heritage of Outstanding Universal Value (OUV). 

It is my pleasure to announce two important initiatives that the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment will be releasing to assist in delivering protection of the Outstanding Universal Value of the TWWHA.

The initiatives are:

  • TWWHA Natural Values Climate Change Adaptation Strategy: 2021 – 2031; and
  • TWWHA Biosecurity Strategy: 2021- 2031

The Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) has finalised the Natural Values Climate Change Adaptation Strategy which aims to manage risk by planning for the potential impact of heatwaves, seasonality of weather variables, coastal erosion and extreme weather events.

In addition to the Natural Values Climate Change Adaptation Strategy, I am also pleased to announce the Government’s delivery of a biosecurity strategy to protect the TWWHA by reducing the risk of invasive organisms.

The PWS TWWHA Biosecurity Strategy 2021-2031 identifies seven goals to address biosecurity risks within the TWWHA. This Strategy aims to minimise these risks through effective leadership, planning, communication, documentation, training, education, research, compliance, co-ordination, and emergency response.

These initiatives are designed to accompany the TWWHA Management Plan to support and guide the management of the TWWHA.

These two strategies are now available to view on the DPIPWE website, and I would like to thank all those who have provided expertise and insights during the stakeholder engagement and public consultation processes.

Feedback sought on Cockle Creek campground upgrades

Jacquie Petrusma, Minister for Parks

Feedback sought on Cockle Creek campground upgrades

14 August 2021

Tasmanians are encouraged to provide feedback on the proposed upgrades to the Catamaran and Ramsgate campgrounds at Cockle Creek in the Southwest National Park as part of a $3 million project from the Tasmanian Liberal Government’s ‘Parks Powering Regional Economies’ election commitment.

We know that visitors love camping at Cockle Creek due to its tranquil coves, sandy beaches and distant mountain peaks. These plans will ensure the campgrounds are maintained and preserved for generations to come.

These commitments support the sustainable management of the precinct’s cultural values, as well as tourism and recreational experiences at the southern-most gateway to the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area (TWWHA) and the Southwest National Park.

Consultation on the proposed upgrades include:

  • Managing the campground and day use areas more sustainably to protect the natural and cultural values;
  • Relocating the roads behind the camping areas to increase the overall amenity and reduce the safety risk issues of crossing roads to reach the foreshore;
  • Minimising vehicle entry points, internal vehicle access tracks and parking to improve safety and to maximise camping space; and
  • Providing for a better mix of camping style opportunities to cater for differing needs.

Other proposed projects at the site include upgraded toilets along with improved drainage and access to boat ramps and boat launching sites.

The Cockle Creek Precinct Site Plan  was released for public comment in September 2018, with Stage One delivering a new gateway shelter, increased car parking and upgraded toilets, completed in 2020.

To view the draft plans and provide feedback on this stage of the Cockle Creek Campground Upgrades Project, visit the PWS website at www.parks.tas.gov.au.

The feedback period closes on Monday 13 September.